Review: The First Days

September 22, 2012 § 2 Comments

The First Days
The First Days by Rhiannon Frater

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Ever since reading [b:Feed|7094569|Feed (Newsflesh, #1)|Mira Grant|http://photo.goodreads.com/books/1335958027s/7094569.jpg|7351419] by Mira Grant I have been strangely drawn to zombie fiction. (Thank you Wendy, Maja, and Michelle) This is especially strange considering that I’m usually pretty squeamish and blood and guts fiction has never been my thing. While I’m still not a fan of the gore, for some reason, I seem to enjoy stories about how people survive in a world gone completely insane. The First Days certainly fits in that category with a sizable helping of the gory bits included.

The First Days begins by traumatizing the reader into a state of frozen terror by describing how a woman is watching her 3 year old’s bloody fingers scrabbling under the door in an attempt to get to her and goes on to explain how the woman had earlier walked in on her husband consuming the child in his crib and she wonders how there was enough left of him to make it downstairs since her husband has always been known to have a big appetite. With such an insane beginning, I was repulsed by the story and also intrigued with where this author could possibly go from there.

While I don’t believe The First Days had the emotional impact of Feed, it definitely held my interest from start to finish. The rest of the book didn’t exactly fulfill the promise of that first chapter, but there was no shortage of zombie action either. The fast moving plot and well written female characters made up for the fact that the male characters, other than Jenni’s stepson Jason, were pretty meh. I also felt like there were a lot of unnecessary explanations about Katie’s sexuality. Jenni and Katie’s weird bond was fascinating but the stand-out character for me was Narit, who fascinated me for some reason.

The First Days is a blood soaked crazy look at how chaotic a zombie apocalypse can be. I absolutely enjoyed this from beginning to end and am looking forward to reading the second in the series.

View all my reviews

Review- The Forest of Hands and Teeth

September 18, 2012 § 11 Comments

The Forest of Hands and Teeth

                                                            by Carrie Ryan

                                                            Narrated by Vane Millon
The Forest of Hands and Teeth (The Forest of Hands and Teeth, #1)

The Forest of Hands and Teeth is reminiscent of the movie The Village, a group of people are living in a small isolated village surrounded by a high fence which separates them from the undead, or as the book calls them, the unconsecrated. The main character, Mary, is out doing her daily chores as the zombies claw at the fence trying desperately to get inside, when suddenly the sirens blare signalling an emergency, possibly a breach. This emergency begins a series of events which dramatically alter Mary and the rest of the villager’s day to day existence. While the villagers look to the Sister’s to answer their questions and explain god’s will, the Sister’s may be hiding some secrets that could endanger their very existence. Meanwhile, Mary’s main concern is that the brother that she is crushing on has chosen her best friend to marry and she might be stuck with the other brother instead.

I listened to the audio of this and I would not recommend it to anyone considering reading this. You should read it in either print or ebook format. The narrator was very lifeless and monotone and frequently used odd pronunciation. She also, for some unknown reason, used a spanish-like accent for some of the characters which just didn’t fit in a story where the characters had all lived in the same isolated village for generations. I felt like either ALL of the characters should have an accent, or NONE of the characters should have an accent.

I have such a mixed opinion about The Forest of Hands and Teeth. I really enjoyed the story but found Mary, the main character, to be absolutely insufferable. I would say that she is one of the most well written godawful characters I’ve ever read. I don’t know that I’ve ever read a more frustratingly selfish main character. I can’t even call her a “heroine” because all she really manages to do is put people in a lot of really bad situations. Apparently, throughout Mary’s life her mother had told her stories about life before the zombies and many stories in particular about the ocean. So now Mary’s only obsession, other than which brother she loves that day, is making her way to the ocean regardless of who she puts in danger to do it, even though she’s not completely sure if it even exists.

I actually found most of the players to be rather 2 dimensional and spiritless and I spent most of my time hoping one of them would be eaten by a zombie. Mary’s brother was the only one who showed a bit of personality sometimes, unfortunately it wasn’t exactly a winning personality. He was a bit of an asshat. The two brothers were equally insufferable as they constantly made long winded angst filled declarations of their devotion to Mary who couldn’t make up her mind which one she loved. I was hoping zombies would eat them too.

 ‎“He’s so tender, so eager to make me happy in ways that no one else has. Tears start to crowd in my eyes and my body begins to respond to this man as if it were his brother whispering into my ear. As if my body can’t tell the difference between the two, between their whispers and the feel of their breath on my flesh.”

The fact that she basically admitted that she was just a run of the mill ho almost made her character a little more interesting than she had been up to this point. I was still hoping a zombie would eat her though….

On the other hand, the writing and world building was wonderful and the flow of the plot was evenly paced and enjoyable. I honestly don’t understand how I liked a book so much when I didn’t like any of the people in it. Some of the instances when the villagers were going about their day to day existence and the author would describe the scene with zombies just feet away literally breaking their fingers off in the fence trying to get in and a constant cacophony of undead moans was the  background noise to the point that only its absence was notable. This world was so creepy and written in such a matter of fact way that I could really feel the hopelessness of this kind of existence. This book definitely left me with some haunting images of what unthinkable things could happen in such a world.

I don’t know if I’m going to continue to the next book. As much as I loved the writing and story, the ending left me hating the main character even more than I had through the story and I really don’t care what happens to her unless it includes being eaten by a zombie.

Review: Monument 14

August 21, 2012 § 5 Comments

Monument 14
Monument 14 by Emmy Laybourne

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Monument 14 takes place in small town Colorado where 14 kids, ranging in ages from 5 to 16-17 find themselves trapped in a Greenway store while the world falls apart around them. On a seemingly normal day, Dean and his tech-savvy little brother Alex race to catch their school bus. On the way to school, crushing oversize hail begins denting the roof of the bus, breaking the windows, and in an effort to get the kids to safety, the two school buses quickly go to the Greenway store, which seems to be like a super Walmart. Once inside, the bus driver goes to find help and the 14 kids find themselves alone in the store as the riot gates come down essentially trapping them inside, which may be a good thing since they soon find out that a series of natural, and not-so-natural disasters are tearing the US to pieces around them. The Greenway store might be the safest place to be, unless they fall apart themselves.

The plot was pretty fast paced. It definitely kept me reading up into the wee hours of the night. The story had a sort of Lord of the Flies feel with the older kids having a power struggle about who would be in charge and how best to survive. I very much enjoyed the whole concept of the story while the execution sometimes left a little to be desired. Nonetheless, Monument 14 certainly kept me on the edge of my seat.

The story is told from the perspective of Dean, a bookish teen who is chronicling the events as they unfold. The interaction between all of the characters was fascinating. There is one particular character, a 5 or 6 year old named Max who told some of the most outlandish stories about his life. While there were a few crushes and hookups among the older teens, there wasn’t any real romance in this story, although it seemed to be heading in that direction.

The writing sometimes fell a bit short for me. I felt like using the teenage Dean to narrate the story was a way to compensate for less than stellar writing. The story felt choppy in places and jumped around a bit and I would have liked to seen some more character development in the older teens. However, as you see by my 4 star rating, I truly enjoyed Monument 14 and I won’t hesitate to pick up the next in the series. There was quite a cliffhanger ending and not much was resolved in this book, which is a pet peeve of mine and I considered only rating this 3 stars because of that. But I didn’t simply because I really liked this book, despite its flaws.

View all my reviews

Where Am I?

You are currently browsing the Zombies category at The Happy Booker.